QB Power Out Of The Spread Offense

I've talked a lot in previous posts how the spread offense, especially the single wing formation when the quarterback is running the ball gives an offense a mathematical advantage, as opposed to running the the power out of a conventional set with the quarterback handing off the ball to a running-back.
 
Below are two diagrams with a description of both 'Power' plays:
 
1) Ace's Right - Power Right (one back set)
 
 
 
The diagram above shows a classic one back 'Power' out of an Ace's formation (TE/Flanker strength / Twins weak).
 
If you split the midline of the LOS (line of scrimmage) using the centers 'crotch', you'll see that the numbers read as "4 blocking 4" (counting the backside guard coming around on the power trap block).  Good blocking numbers assuming everyone can hold their blocks playside and allow no penetration to blow up the play in the backfield.
 
The playside defensive tackle and Backer (B) always scare me here, as a well executed 'X' stunt on the snap can really blow this up, placing a lot of pressure on your playside guard.
 
Lets look at this play out of the spread offense/single wing formation.
 
2) Ace's Right - Gun - QB Power Right
 
 
 
The diagram above shows a single wing 'Power' out of an Ace's formation (TE/Flanker/HB-FB strength / Twins weak).
 
If you split the midline of the LOS (line of scrimmage) using the centers 'crotch', you'll see that the numbers read as "5 blocking 4" (counting the backside guard coming around on the power trap block).  Excellent blocking numbers assuming everyone can hold their blocks playside and allow no penetration to blow up the play in the backfield.
 
The playside defensive tackle and Backer (B) scaring me in diagram one (1) don't scare me anymore, because we have a nice two on two match-up as long as our playside guard and tackle follow their zone blocking rules... both A and B gap should be well secured against any 'X' stunt on the snap.
 
In addition, simple math tells us that 5 are blocking 4 playside, so even if the playside 'C-Gap' defensive end is a beast and our TE is having problems getting to his inside V, our pulling guard backside on the Power can assist without the play blowing up, because the inside backer is blocked already by the G-T combo.
 
Coach Saban, head football coach at the University of Alabama calls this the '11th gap' phenomenon, something the Florida Gators do very well in the SEC.
 
I call it a great formation, and a great play that gives me numbers at the point of attack.
 
Does the 'Tebow Jump-Pass' make sense now? Check out the F (free safety) sitting back there (I guess you can call him the wild-card) in the diagram... do you 'automatic' him into the box to gain the extra defender? Possibly, if you are sure the single wing QB cannot hit the side of a barn with the football.
 
But what about if it's Tim Tebow, Patrick White, Vince Young, Terrelle Pryor, or Dennis Dixon??
 
Keep spreading u'm!
 
--Mark
 
www.SpreadOffense.tv (video sharing platform)
 
 
 

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